Journey to Multifamily Millions

How to Effectively Build Relationships and Your Business with Jason Wright, Ep 65

October 12, 2023 Tim Season 1 Episode 65
Journey to Multifamily Millions
How to Effectively Build Relationships and Your Business with Jason Wright, Ep 65
Show Notes Transcript

Episode Summary

This podcast is aimed at equipping listeners with substantial knowledge in multifamily real estate investing, sharing inspiring experiences from experts well-versed in the different stages of wealth creation through real estate. Meet our host, the founder and CEO of ZANA Investments, Tim Little. 

Today's guest is Jason Wright, He is the Founder and CEO of Intentionally Inspirational, a digital marketing strategy and automation firm. 

He is also a speaker, author, entrepreneur, passive real estate investor, and digital marketing architect with a passion for helping other real estate investors and entrepreneurs with their sales funnels.

In this episode, Jason shares his entrepreneurial journey, highlighting the importance of patience, planning, and perseverance. 

He delves into lead capture, conversion, and effective CRM strategies, emphasizing the power of text messages in lead nurturing. Stay tuned!

Episode Topics

[01:25]  Meet our guest, Jason Wright
[02:16 ] From Grass Cutting to Real Estate Success
[08:13]  Navigating Entrepreneurship: Patience, Planning, and Perseverance
[15:53]   Maximizing Lead Capture and Conversion: Lessons from Entrepreneurs
[21:23]   The Power of Consistent Touchpoints: Email vs. Text in Lead Nurturing
[26:43]  Mastering the Funnel: From Traffic to Conversions
[30:58]  What is one red flag every investor should look out for?
[31:49]   What is a myth about the real estate business?
[32:23]   Connecting to Jason


Notable Quotes

  • "I never forgot the taste of earning my own dollar and doing it my own way."- Jason Wright
  • "Quick's not really part of the equation. Timelines are different but think about this. If you're a wine drinker, a bourbon drinker, or a cigar smoker, have you ever had a premium product that was aged for a week or two weeks? No, it takes time." - Jason Wright
  • "So much about being successful in entrepreneurism is getting out of your comfort zone."-Tim Little
  • "Your email list is just a piece of your overall strategy. You want to make those touch points and build that relationship just like you do in life." - Jason Wright
  • "Think about it as a new relationship in your everyday life. There's going to be more conversation and more frequent conversation at the beginning."- Jason Wright
  • "Text is amazing because, unlike an email, it covers up the screen on your phone. People's mentality is very different in text." -Tim Little
  • "The best traffic I've ever found is referral traffic." - Jason Wright


Connect with Jason Wright

👉 Connect with Tim

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https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/journey-to-multifamily-millions/id1634643497

Ep 65 - Jason Wright (audio)

[00:00:00] Jason Wright: I was wrong about this, I thought I would touch people about six times before our call through automation. Email and text. It's actually about 10, right? Think about it as a new relationship in your everyday life. There's going to be more conversation and more frequent conversation at the beginning, right? Your best friends, your oldest friends, you don't need to talk to them all the time, but it's nice to touch base once in a while. More at the beginning. So if somebody books a call with me on average, and little reminders here and there. And it makes a big difference because when I'm getting on a call or when your audience is getting on a call with new investors, they already have some idea of what your style is. They've probably looked around a little bit. They have some idea of what you do and it makes a big difference. It makes for a more comfortable, more relaxed conversation. And then after that, if somebody's thinking about investing, it's important to continue to make those efforts.

[00:01:25] Tim Little: Hello, everyone, and welcome to the journey to multifamily millions. I'm your host, founder, and CEO of ZANA Investments. And on today's show, we have with us Jason Wright. Jason is the founder and CEO of Intentionally Inspirational, a digital marketing strategy and automation firm. He's also a speaker, author, entrepreneur, passive real estate investor, and digital marketing architect with a passion for helping other real estate investors and entrepreneurs with their sales funnels. Jason, welcome to the 

[00:01:57] Jason Wright: show. Thanks for having me, Tim. Excited to be here. Yeah. 

[00:02:00] Tim Little: And it is great to have you. So I gave everyone a high-level overview of your background, but on this show, we really like to get into the details of how you got started on your journey. So please take us back to the beginning and tell us how you got to where you are 

[00:02:16] Jason Wright: today. Sure. So the old story that really is important for the new story starts when I was 14 years old. Back then, my life was fishing. I loved fishing. I loved all the tackle, all the new lures. And growing up in central Indiana, you could play some sports and you could fish, and that was really all there was to do. And I remember my mom reaching this point where she's You have more tackle than any adult I know. We're done. We're not buying any more. I'm like, but you haven't seen the newest catalog, Mom. You don't understand. And she's If you want more stuff, go make some money and buy it yourself. I'm like, okay. So we lived in a cul de sac and there were three houses in the cul de sac that were always overgrown, like the grass. And I was pretty good at cutting grass. So I knocked on some doors and got three clients right away. And I started making 75 bucks a week, which was good money back then. I didn't have any bills, so I could keep feeding that passion. I never forgot the taste of earning my own dollar and doing it my own way. So fast forward to seven years into the corporate world, I was doing HR, I was doing sales, I was doing safety. And I remember I was working for a company that a guy started the guy didn't have any formal education, and he built this gigantic. Empire, right? It was like 300 million a year. And I remember thinking, man, if this guy can do that, surely I can start my own company online. So I have some control over my time and at least pay my bills. That was the goal. Can I just pay, can I make 50 grand from home? Like it's I don't even need big stuff. I just, don't want to commute. I just want some control over my time.  So I convinced my wife to get on board with me quitting. My job is making about 80, 000 a year back then I quit my job. The next day I went and bought a luxury car and we were out of money in about two months. Terrible idea. Never made a cent with the magazine business I was trying to start in neighborhoods. Had to actually go to my mom's sister and say, Hey I need help buying groceries. Like we're in a bad spot. I'm doing anything I can to make money, but it's not going well. So they helped us for about six months as I worked and hustled and scraped, but I had to go back to corporate. So a lot of people don't realize sometimes you have to go back if you quit too soon. So we went back to corporate I was working on this business. So I knew the name right away, intentionally inspirational. I didn't know what it meant, but I knew it would change my life. So we started off blogging. About quitting the nine-to-five, I learned a bit of marketing, trying to get my message out there, but always felt like an imposter because I was like, I haven't really done so successfully yet myself, but I know I will as we started blogging and getting our marketing out there a little bit. I was using Upwork to try to find anything I could to generate money for this new business. And I started noticing a lot of people were looking for help with marketing, just things I had just learned myself, very simple stuff to begin with, but I was able to start generating just some part-time occasional income. As I learned about sales funnels I started generating more and more money through Upwork because there was a big demand for Facebook ads click funnels and active campaigns. And we fast forward to now. Seven and a half years later, four or five major pivots. We work exclusively with real estate investors and exclusively with an active campaign. The truth is the journey is ugly. The journey is brutal. But if you do anything long enough, you're eventually going to figure it out. 

[00:05:37] Tim Little: Yeah, I love that. And I love hearing people's, first entrepreneurial spark story. Some people it's. Wait, lemonade stands, other people, it's cutting grass. Yeah. But usually, there was some parent somewhere who said, get out and make your own money. Come up with an idea and charge for it. Yep. I washed cars for my uncles. I did the grass-cutting thing too. , I don't remember what my marketing looked like other than knocking on doors and asking people if they needed their grass cut. But then my next one went to the first time I discovered the wholesale clubs. And one of my uncles had a membership. And so we went in and I was just mesmerized by these giant towering displays of stuff. And I found the candy aisle. And so I wound up buying like the big thing of the short 20, 25 bucks.  And then I was selling those for, I don't know, I think the Jolly Ranchers were 10 cents a piece. And the blow pops, I think I was selling them for 25 cents each or three for 50 to, induce more sales. And I was making pretty good money on that too, for the couple of weeks that it lasted until the teacher shut me down. And then that business was squashed in an instant. It took me a little while longer for that entrepreneurial spark to, come back up but luckily it did. It came back up again. Now, just took a couple of decades. No, that's great, though. And then I want to dig into some of that other stuff and talk about starting your own company. And your goal when you first started was really just to you wanted it to be good enough to pay your bills and to free up your time. So it's not like you had delusions of being a millionaire within a year or two or anything like that. Is that accurate? 

[00:07:28] Jason Wright: Yeah. One thing that's funny now is I remember when I told my wife, I was like, we're going to, we're going to start these magazines. And she's how much money do you think we'll make? And I said, I think I'll replace our income. In three months. And in hindsight, I just made that up. There's no metric. And it literally took two years to make up that monthly income or two and a half years. Like it took a long time. No, I just like, from the get-go, I was like, I want to build location freedom. I just want more options in life. And I was like, if I'm wasting two hours a day driving, that's 40 hours a month. I'm just setting it on fire. So I was like, I've got to figure this out. So yeah, it was a very humble goal. And I was like if I get control of my time and I can work from home, then I can build bigger and, more grand goals from there.

[00:08:14] Tim Little: Yeah, no, that's awesome. And the only reason I ask is because we see so much on YouTube nowadays, right? You get rich in 30 days and just these outlandish claims. And then I think people have gotten to this point where they expect immediate gratification, even within multifamily, the business that I'm in gurus are selling, do your first deal, and within, one year you'll be financially free. And it's that's not usually how this works. There may be some outliers here and there, but I think there needs to be, a bit of a reality check for anyone who believes that. 

[00:08:48] Jason Wright: Yeah, there's a kind of analogy when you're talking about it that pops into my head. Yeah, a lot of people will sell, get rich quickly, or do anything quick, right? And quick's not really part of the equation. Timelines are different but think about this. If you're a wine drinker a bourbon drinker or a cigar smoker have you ever had a premium product that was aged for, a week or two weeks? No, it takes time. So time is part of the equation. And when you speed that up, the end result is going to be inferior. That's just my experience with business and with life. So I've built this business up three times to a level and then it came crashing down. So I've had to start over. Multiple times because the model I was rolling with had its limitations. So it's definitely not a linear trajectory. It's like a heartbeat up and down, but, eventually, you start to figure out kind of your niche and what works for you. 

[00:09:38] Tim Little: Yeah. And let's talk about what that, growth looks like in terms of, I think the question that a lot of entrepreneurs have, be they in your business or even within multifamily is knowing when to make that first hire. What that should look like, that's a significant decision for a lot of people, right? Yeah. You're presumably paying a lot of money in a relatively new business that's maybe not making a ton with the hope or expectation that you'll scale exponentially. Can you talk about it? Some of the decision processes that went through your head on that first hiring decision and subsequent ones.

[00:10:20] Jason Wright: Yeah. Good question. A mistake, like you say, it's a chicken and egg scenario. A mistake that a lot of people have, no one can say a mistake, I guess a misconception, is that it's really expensive to bring on that first person. I tell people Even if you can get a VA to help you like my first hire was a VA and they helped me like two hours a week All right, and it doesn't sound like much but when you're pinching every hour out of your weeks You got family time. Maybe you have a full-time job like every hour matters. So Somebody helping you three to five hours a week with social media, emails, and different things like that can be wildly impactful, and it's not going to cost you a lot of money. So instead of maybe taking profit yourself, you hire that person. The advice I would give the old Jason the younger me, was, would be like, hey, don't quit your day job until you have consistent income with the side thing. And I didn't do that, and I had to go back and do it anyway, so I should have just done it, to begin with. I was hired very early. I remember my wife going, we don't even make any money. How are we paying this person? Oh, it's no big deal. It's 10 an hour, two hours a week. It's 20 bucks a week. And I was using a credit card to pay somebody because I knew eventually I would need that team. And then as we started to grow a little bit, we were able to make sense of it. Now there's a me and wife and six more. So there's eight of us, but yeah, it's it's a process. And I think that first virtual hire three to five hours a week is really helpful and pretty affordable for a lot of people.

[00:11:44] Tim Little: Yeah, no, totally echo that sentiment because yeah, people usually think in US wage terms but that doesn't have to be, nor would I recommend that it be your first hire. Like you said. Even hiring someone part-time can be said, very impactful in terms of freeing up your time. Because once you start doing all that stuff, whether it's, social media, or blogging all those things start to take up a lot of time. And then if you still have that, That nine to five, you don't have a whole lot of time in the first place. So it can make a huge difference in, I think the timeline of how fast your bill business builds, because it's like having another person helping you out instead of you trying to do it all yourself. Yep. And then the other thing that you mentioned that, I think. It's not controversial, but there's definitely some debate is the don't quit your job until you've replaced your income. So often I'll hear the whole burn the boats mantra, and I totally do not agree with that. So I'm more in your camp. Hey, let's have a plan. Let's do this responsibly. And maybe that changes based on your situation, right? If you have, significant other kids, et cetera, you have people that are, you are responsible for other than yourself. If you're 21 and you're just out there doing the thing, then yeah, you can take those risks and burn the boats because it'll give you the motivation you need to succeed or else. But I think for the rest of us, it makes a lot more sense to make a plan. And so what I did is I saved up a certain amount of money and said, Hey, I will continue to pay the bills that I'm paying now for this period of time. Hopefully, within that time, I can get the business off the ground to the point where it's starting to replace my income now, did that necessarily come to fruition? Not necessarily, but I'll tell you what, it gave us a whole lot of peace of mind. In that period when I was at least building the foundation of my business and we weren't having to worry about will the mortgage would get paid, will the lights get shut off, et cetera, because we didn't just burn the boats, and, leave a stable income with no plan in place.

[00:14:06] Jason Wright: Yeah, I think with, this is the world we live in on social media, people will show you what they want you to see. So I talked to a guy one time and he was telling me, I had this job and I quit and I'm all in. And I dug into it a little more, and come to find out his wife was like a plastic surgeon and I'm like, bro. So like you never know the full story, but for me it was so much pressure. I was actually sitting up above where I am now up on the third floor of this house. And I remember sitting there looking at the bills going. I'm not going to be able to pay for any of these. So the absolute terror of wrecking our day-to-day life is what I needed because when I get stressed in business, I get pissed off. And when I get pissed off, I get shit done. Like the reason my family's in Georgia. And I'm in Indiana to sell this house because there is no better person. Turned me loose on the property with no rules and it's been three days. And this house looks like no one's ever lived in it. Like it's, I have nothing better to do than to execute on this goal. It's like you have to know yourself. Not everybody's wired that way, but. I was selling tools and telling guns and hunting and fishing gear and all kinds of stuff and doing landscape on my street to supplement and pay bills while we were building this business. So my experience was one of sheer terror and that made me say, I, my record was nine months in a row with late mortgage fees. Where I couldn't pay the mortgage on time. It never hit credit. I never let it go 30 days, but nine months in a row was my record. And I was, anything I could do to make it happen. Not let that happen is what I did. And eventually, between going back to corporate and scrapping around, I was able to finally get ahead of it. That's not fun. And that is not for most people. Most people will bow out, but you gotta be a weirdo to be an entrepreneur anyway. 

[00:15:53] Tim Little: Yeah. And so I think that shows both sides of the coin, right? Will that pressure force you to perform? Yeah, probably. Yes. I consider myself the same way, right? I'm like a piece of coal. Once I got that pressure, I turned into a diamond, didn't I? I perform when necessary. The military Has taught me that. But do I like being in those situations? Is there something that I could have done to prevent it? No. And it sounds like, you're in the same way you rose to the occasion, but there's You know, had you to do it over again, it sounds like you would have done it a little differently.

 

[00:17:03] Jason Wright: What's funny about that? I don't know that I would have. Because there was one thing that echoed in my mind. I had a point to prove. There are people in my family and in my neighborhood, in my life, that literally were like, you can't succeed. It's not going to work. And all I wanted to do was prove them wrong. So Frank Sinatra has a quote, the best revenge is massive success. And I would think about it all day long, like a crazy person, like I have got to prove these people wrong. And those people don't say anything to me now. 

[00:17:30] Tim Little: No, that's awesome. And, it reminds me of the different techniques for creating a goal, right? Most people create a goal to say, I want to do this so I can do that. Buy the Ferrari, get a second home, and have freedom of time. But the other technique that isn't used as often, but can often be more powerful is the, if I don't complete this goal, this will happen. So showing the negative impact because we fear that more than we aspire for things, right? Yep. 

[00:18:03] Jason Wright: Yeah, it's interesting. It's the whole scenario. What motivates somebody more to do something? Is it a proverbial gun to the temple or is it a million dollars in cash? Everybody's going to react to one of them. Some people react to both, but it's an interesting thing to think about because people will say I can't do that. If I offered you a million dollars, could you do it? No. If I put a gun to your head. Yeah, I think I could do it then. You can't do it. It's an interesting mentality shift because when you think of things in those terms if I ask you to fly from Florida to Indiana with your arms, It's not going to happen, bro. No matter if I do either scenario, if I ask you to do something that's uncomfortable and you say you can't when you have the right motivation, whether it's positive or negative, you find out you can. 

[00:18:44] Tim Little: Yep. And so much about being successful in entrepreneurism is getting out of your comfort zone as I've come to.  All so I think a lot of entrepreneurs, like myself. Get really focused on getting ourselves out there and, being recognized as an industry expert, but don't necessarily have a great system for capturing and capitalizing on any of those leads that we get. Is that what you're seeing in the course of your 

[00:19:10] Jason Wright: business?Always in forever. It'll always be a giant opportunity for the majority of people. I was smoking a cigar last night with a good buddy and he is a monster at social media traffic, huge followings, all this stuff. And it was years and years before he had some kind of a plan to work on, the back end of the funnel, so to speak. What do I do with these leads? So he was saying last night, if he goes, can you imagine if you had My traffic skills with what you're doing? I was like, wow, I have no idea what my life would look like, but it would be nuts. Yeah, it's huge to have a plan on what you should do with that lead. Otherwise, it's what's the point of doing it? 

[00:19:46] Tim Little: Yeah. You can have a million followers, but if you have no way to capture them, you don't own those followers. Whatever platform you're on owns those followers. Absolutely. All right. Let's say that I made the effort to set up the CRM, I threw in a few automation, maybe even had a welcome series of emails, stuff like that. What are the biggest mistakes that you and your team see when they start to dig clients back into the funnel? 

[00:20:15] Jason Wright: Yep. We see the gamut. We see the people that it's I've never had a website. I don't even know what a CRM is. We have the people that feel like they've got some pretty good stuff going. And then we have the people that say they're experts that know even less than the people with a little bit going. The biggest thing I see is that automation is in silos, right? So somebody might have a couple of different automations in their business and then.  If somebody goes through one and they get to the end, then they just sit there and nothing ever happens again. So what you need to do is really think of different ways in your email list, whether it's business cards from an event, whether it's lead magnets, whether it's different types of investments with our forms. There needs to be some kind of journey and everybody needs to end up in the same place because your email list is just a piece of your overall strategy. But once you get people in your world, you want to make those touch points and build that relationship just like you do in life. Just things not flowing together is probably the biggest glaring thing closely related. The logic they use as far as within the CRM, doesn't make any sense. So I'll say to people what are you hoping will happen here? And they'll tell me and what they've set up is not going to accomplish that. 

[00:21:23] Tim Little: Yeah. And I know I've certainly been guilty of probably a few of those things you talked about. I know like my original welcome series, it was, say it was three emails long, right? Hey, welcome, welcome to Zana Investments, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. They go to the second one, they go to the third one. And after the third one. That's it. Nothing ever happens again. They may get my monthly newsletters or if I have a deal that comes out, but those touches may be, a month apart. So what are your thoughts on this? How often do you need to be proverbially touching the intended lead in order to keep it warm? 

[00:22:02] Jason Wright: Yeah, it's if you do the thing I've been just obsessed with lately is think about it as a new relationship in your everyday life. There's going to be more conversation and more frequent conversation at the beginning, right? Your best friends, your oldest friends, you don't need to talk to them all the time, but it's nice to touch base once in a while. More at the beginning. So if somebody books a call with me on average, and I was wrong about this, I thought I would touch people about six times before our call through automation. Email and text. It's actually about 10, right? Little reminders here and there. And it makes a big difference because when I'm getting on a call or when your audience is getting on a call with new investors, they already have some idea of what your style is. They've probably looked around a little bit. They have some idea of what you do and it makes a big difference. It makes for a more comfortable, more relaxed conversation. And then after that, if somebody's thinking about investing, it's important to continue to make those efforts. So hopefully that answers your question. 

[00:22:55] Tim Little: Yeah, absolutely. And I think, a lot of people might find that surprising that you talked about 10 touches just to even get on that call to get a call booked. And I think that makes sense to me now. But I think like a lot of people, I would have just assumed like, Hey, I sent an email. Or two, they'll want to book a call with me and talk about this more Yeah, 

[00:23:16] Jason Wright: and the thing that people don't realize is Your emails not may not be reaching them. I have somebody that I'm talking to right now It's a great opportunity. We both want to talk to each other, but her emails keep not hitting my inbox They're not in spam either. So they're getting filtered out and that's a thing so we've begun texting and I can at least get in touch with her because it's like sometimes, just relying on email alone, you're going to miss opportunities for that reason. There's the big black hole of deliverability and there are things you can do to improve it, but you can't own it and make it perfect. It's something to think about there for sure. Yeah, we're talking about people booking a call with me between the time they book the call. And we talk, it's 10 touches, but somebody may not book a call with me. So they get touched five or 10 times, either. And here's something to think about when people hear touch points and they go, okay, that's an email. They always assume it's got to be this 500 to a thousand-word email. It can be one or two sentences. It doesn't need to be long. They're going to forget what they read anyway. They're going to go, Oh yeah, Tim hit me up. Okay. They remember the interaction or the touch point. So that's where the value is at. 

[00:24:24] Tim Little: Yeah. And you brought up a text as being, more important. How important is that becoming nowadays as so many more people use text as their primary? Most of the time they're even reading their emails on their phone. It is text. Something that people need to start thinking a lot more about if they aren't already and incorporating that into, how they're cultivating their leads in their CRM or through third-party apps. 

[00:24:51] Jason Wright: Absolutely. So just in the last couple of weeks, there's a regulatory. A committee that oversees text marketing. They've really cracked down, which is a good thing on what you're using it for and proving that you're giving people a heads up while you're using their phone number and stuff like that. And text is amazing because, unlike an email, it covers up the screen on your phone, right? You're going to see it. You can't not see it unless you I guess adjust the notification settings in your phone for all text So how many times a day do you get a junk text probably almost never there's not a lot of competition We all get pounded with emails all day every day, but we don't want text. So Text is it gets a very high open rate engagement is Significantly higher than email and people's mentality is very different in text. So when you're texting You're used to texting your family, your wife, your friends, et cetera. So you're in a relaxed conversational state of mind. When you talk to potential investors through text, they're in that state of mind as well. If you ever look at an email response versus a text response, you'll start noticing those trends. So yeah, my, my life would look very different. My business would look very different without text. It's insane not to be using texts in today's 

[00:26:05] Tim Little: world. Yeah. And I think I see that myself too, right? Like I'm more willing to respond. To a text than I am to an email. I feel like an email is an ordeal to respond to, but I still get text messages. Hey, are you looking to sell your house at this address? And even though I know it's a pitch text. Yeah. A lot of times I'll still answer with no, not interested, or I don't own that property anymore, or whatever the case may be. Whereas with an email, I would probably just delete it. 

[00:26:41] Jason Wright: Yeah, absolutely. 

[00:26:43] Tim Little: No, that's interesting. All right. So I know that you focus a lot on the bottom of the funnel, really cultivating those leads and turning them into customers, investors, whatever the case may be. What advice do you have to get more leads into the top of that funnel?

[00:26:58] Jason Wright: Yep. So that's what I call traffic. So traffic's fun, right? Once you've got your pages, your website, and you've got your CRM and my case active campaign, or the back end of the funnel set up, you have the machine built. The traffic piece never ends, right? How do I get my company in front of new audiences? That's what we're thinking about. For your audience, LinkedIn is going to be great for social. YouTube's going to be great. Podcasting is awesome. So even if you don't want your own show, get on other people's shows that have a relevant audience. So a mistake I see with investors is they just get on other investors' shows and everybody does the same thing, but mix it up a little bit. Get it on a podcast with an audience that you want that may have never heard what you do. The other piece is to be very intentional with your time. Anything I'm doing, whether I'm speaking or I'm, jumping in a mastermind to teach or whatever, I'm always very aware of the audience. Is this audience relevant to something that I do? If not, say no. It's probably not a good part of your time. Using social media, using events getting on people's podcasts and you don't need to do everything. I used to have this thought that I had to be on every social channel, and it was extremely difficult to do well. It's extremely difficult to even do too well. Pick the one you're comfortable with. If you hate video, don't do YouTube, right? It's not gonna be a good fit. It's gonna be awkward. Consistency is the name of the game. And one thing that people never think about is the best traffic I've ever found. Is referral traffic, right? So if you get a referral, somebody becomes an investor, or a client, and find a way to make that relationship continue to grow and flourish. So it's, paid referrals are the best thing we do. We pay after sales have been made to the lead source and it's better than ads because you don't spend money unless you're making money. So hope that helps. 

[00:28:48] Tim Little: Yeah, no, that makes a lot of sense. One thing I didn't hear you mention that you had talked about earlier was blogs. Are blogs still a meaningful way to get your name, and your company out there? Is there some advantage when it comes to SEO or are they just archaic at this point? So Nate, 

[00:29:04] Jason Wright: it's a very interesting question. I'm just going to speak based on my experience because there are not really absolutes with this stuff, so we were blogging when I started blogging, right? I was the original blogger. We were blogging about quitting nine-to-five. We were a motivational company. So my wife popped into this office I'm in earlier this year and asked how many blogs have we written. So I like peaked in a WordPress. I'm like, Ooh, North of 400, like 425. She said, have we ever booked one phone call from a blog? And I was like, Nope. She goes, never write another blog. I was like, okay, Hey, blog writing team, you all go. It's like I was told by a mentor when I started that I had to blog like I had to blog It was just more like part of marketing and SEO and all this but that's not what works for us I like video because video is quick. It's easy. It's powerful It speeds up the no and trust timeline and I'm good at it So I just lean into what works and keep doing it I'm not writing a blog or an article ever again, and I'm not paying anybody to do it. Hope that makes sense. 

[00:30:07] Tim Little: It does. And, one of the things that I heard from a coach was basically, write 10 blogs, and have those on your website. under the resources or whatever, just so that it looks like you have some content to legitimize you as an authority in whatever field you're in. And, he didn't say to keep writing blogs after that. He just said, you have to have at least those 10, just so people know that you've written some smart stuff about, what you're doing. All right hey, this has been really interesting. I know people are going to get a ton of value out of what we just talked about, but right now we need to move into the turbo round. All right, so I am going to ask you three questions that I ask every guest we have on this show, and I just ask for a quick, honest answer. Are you ready to go? 

[00:30:57] Jason Wright: Born ready. Let's 

[00:30:58] Tim Little: go. All right, let's do it. The first question, what is one red flag every investor should look out 

[00:31:04] Jason Wright: for? I think when somebody's overselling a deal. When it starts to reek of desperation, I would be looking somewhere else, my friend. 

[00:31:13] Tim Little: Yep, desperation, and if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Yep. All right. What is a myth about this business that you would like to set straight? 

[00:31:23] Jason Wright: Yeah. So I'll just talk about marketing in general, whether you're, you're probably a real estate investor, but I'm that in a digital marketing guy. There are no big secrets and tips and tricks and all these things that you've heard Russell Brunson say. There are no shortcuts to success, right? There are good fundamentals. It takes time to build momentum, but as long as you keep going you build your pipeline and you grow your list, good things will happen. Seven-and-a-half-year overnight success story here. 

[00:31:49] Tim Little: There you go. All right. And finally. Jason, what does success look like to you? 

[00:31:55] Jason Wright: Yeah. The answer to that question has changed many times over the years. At this point for me, there's no financial number. It's how can I impact my team and their lives financially. How can I impact my clients, help them grow their investor base, and make more money as well? So it's really all about giving back to those people I can reach. 

[00:32:14] Tim Little: Beautiful. That's awesome. All right. Hey, Jason, please tell our guests how they can get ahold of you. And if there's anything else that you'd like to share with them, 

[00:32:23] Jason Wright: Yeah intentionally inspirational.com. It's our front porch. We've got all kinds of cool resources and things going on there. So I'll direct you there, let you look around. I think you'll find at least one or two things that'll be interesting to you. 

[00:32:34] Tim Little: Absolutely. And we'll have all of that stuff in the show notes. Hey, you dropped some knowledge bombs on us here. Definitely appreciate that. And I look forward to continuing to see you do big things on your journey to multifamily millions. Thanks then. Thank you.